IN PROGRESS RESPONSE

  • Program: Law Enforcement
  • Course: In Progress Response
  • Course #: LAWE2261
  • Total Credits: 2

Course Description

This course will include instruction in the areas of Crimes In-Progress.

Course Evaluation

Refer to Course Syllabus for detailed information regarding the requirements and evaluation standards for this course. The Course Syllabus will be distributed the first week of the course.

Disability Services

Hennepin Technical College offers reasonable accommodations to qualified students with disabilities. If you have a documented disability that may require accommodations, contact the college’s Disability Services Director: Sara Laviolette at Brooklyn Park (763-488-2477) or Jean Kreutter at Eden Prairie (952-995-1544).

Course Goals

The following goals will be addressed in the course:
Demonstrate the proper and safest methods to approach and apprehend high risk suspects
Assess dangers responding to crimes in progress
Identify tactics appropriate to the en-route phase of a crime response
Demonstrate tactics appropriate to approach and search of a building
Practice procedures for confronting suspects and placing him/her under control or arrest
Assess proper procedures for handling barricaded suspects and hostage situations
Demonstrate proper tactics in dealing with suspects possessing weapons
Demonstrate knowledge of the 4th amendment search and seizure techniques
Discuss how peace officers deal with different types of animal complaints
Demonstrate responses to domestic disturbances and sexual assault reports
Demonstrate de-escalation tactics when dealing with persons in crisis and those who are mentally impaired
Demonstrate tactics in how to respond to civil matters
Identify definitions and familiarity with missing person related laws
Demonstrate how to work as a team in active shooter situations
Identify how critical incidents are handled
Explain procedures for responding to juveniles involved in crime scenes as victims or offenders


Minnesota POST Board Learning Objectives:
1.1.1 Describe how perception, sympathy, empathy, compassion and respect affect peace officer
communication.
1.1.2 Discuss barriers to clear communication, e.g. language, stress, bias, lack of common cultural
understanding.
1.1.3 Use and interpret verbal and non-verbal cues to enhance interpersonal communications.
1.1.4 Describe and demonstrate active listening skills including paraphrasing, reflecting meaning, and
summarizing understanding to obtain and clarify information.
1.1.5 Demonstrate reading comprehension skills necessary in law enforcement including: the ability to
differentiate between facts, opinions and propaganda, understanding sequencing of events, and
recognizing cause and effect.
1.1.6 Compose documents that demonstrate competent writing skills, including: writing from the first
person viewpoint, differentiating between facts, inferences and opinions, correctly structuring
sentences and paragraphs, and using correct grammar, spelling, punctuation and capitalization.
1.2.1 Discuss the inter-relationship between core beliefs, integrity and ethical reasoning.
1.2.2 Identify ethical issues in a variety of law enforcement related situations and apply ethical reasoning
to decision making processes.
1.2.3 Evaluate and apply strategies for responding to unethical or illegal actions that may arise within law
enforcement and public safety.
1.2.4 Model behaviors that demonstrate commitment to ethical and professional behavior.
1.2.5 Discuss discretion and how it differs from selective enforcement.
1.2.6 Identify some of the causes and ramifications of public distrust of law enforcement and strategies to
enhance the public trust.
1.2.7 Discuss ethical and responsible use of computers and databases by law enforcement.
1.3.1 Define and describe models of the conscious processes of critical thinking, logical reasoning and
problem solving.
1.3.2 Use structured problem-solving methods to develop creative and innovative solutions to a variety of
problems.
1.3.3 Applying reason and evidence to formulate logical inferences and draw logical conclusions.
1.3.4 Analyze and evaluate ideas, proposals, and solutions to problems using basic forms of logic and
techniques designed to encourage sound reasoning.
1.3.5 Use critical thinking, logical reasoning and problem solving strategies to formulate ideas, make
proposals and suggest solutions a variety of law enforcement related problems or concerns (Minn.
Stat. 626.8455).
1.3.6 Apply critical thinking strategies during team discussions.
1.4.1 Describe decision-making processes and models.
1.4.2 Define the term discretion and discuss when and why peace officers use their best judgment in the
administration of justice and when discretion is not allowed.
1.4.3 Discuss factors that influence police officer use of discretion.
1.4.5 Based on scenarios of peace officer situations, practice making decisions in real time.
1.5.1 Discuss how and why the police function is much broader than law enforcement and why reliance on
criminal law enforcement to solve problems is not always the best course of action.
1.5.2 Explain philosophies and concepts of community policing.
1.5.3 Discuss how community partnerships with law enforcement foster unity and cooperation and how
community alienation may lead to higher risk to officers.
1.5.4 Identify community policing strategies that build rapport, reduce fear and foster community trust in
law enforcement
1.5.5 Identify techniques for: organizing community members so that they are involved and trained in
community policing activities, relating to diverse communities, and relating to individuals with
physical or mental limitations (Minn. Stat. 626.8455, Subd. 1, 2-4).
1.5.6 Identify methods and strategies used by law enforcement to promote crime reduction and loss
prevention in a community.
1.5.7 Explain how collaboration with each of the following groups may reduce crime: local citizens,
community businesses, and service agencies, i.e. crisis intervention teams, social services, school
personnel, and community youth groups.
1.5.8 Explain how law enforcement management of status offenses and local ordinance violations can
positively impact a community.
1.5.9 Describe and give examples of proactive policing versus responsive policing.
1.5.10 Describe problem oriented or problem targeting policing strategies.
1.5.11 Explain how various patrol strategies impact crime, community security and community perceptions
of law enforcement.
1.6.1 Explain how conscious and implicit bias impact human behavior.
1.6.2 Discuss how bias, prejudice, stereotyping, intolerance, insensitivity, partiality, and marginalizing can
affect just application of the law and influence officer and community safety.
1.6.3 Explain the concept of procedural justice as it relates to law enforcement including how fair
processes, impartial decision making, providing respectful opportunity for a voice, and transparency
in actions, bolsters positive community relations and enhances officer and community safety.
1.7.1 Describe characteristics of professional behavior and the Minnesota Standards of Conduct for
licensing Minnesota peace officers.
1.7.5 Employ teamwork skills to foster positive working relationships, accomplish team goals and
effectively utilize team member talents.
1.7.7 Describe traits of and skills for effective leadership including compassion, courage, service, listening,
coaching, mission focus, and team development.
1.7.8 Demonstrate ethical leadership in the accomplishment of goals and objectives.
1.8.1 Discuss the importance of a survival mindset for officers including: physical and psychological
preparation for force encounters, risks associated with complacency, and wearing body armor and
other safety equipment.
1.8.2 Identify the physiological, psychological and emotional effects of stress.
1.8.3 Explain some of the stressors encountered by peace officers and their effect on officers and their
families including: duty related stressors, i.e. frequent encounters with illegal or unethical behaviors,
emotionally charged scenes, people in distress, trauma and tragedy, stressors related to fatigue and
shiftwork, and stress and long term effects associated with hypervigilance.
1.8.4 Discuss physical and psychological effects of stress before, during and after a high risk or traumatic
incident including: the effects of high risk stress on the body including the brain, vision, hearing,
muscles and respiratory system, and the nervous and cardiovascular systems, and how knowledge of
the effects of stress in high risk or life threatening situations can help officers perform under stress.
1.8.5 Discuss critical incident debriefing and identify support services and resources for peace officers.
1.8.6 Discuss Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and acute stress disorders and their symptoms.
1.8.7 Describe officer survival/safety issues relative to a variety of peace officer duties, including traffic
enforcement, arrest, vehicle stops, felony stops, pursuits, and plain clothes and undercover work.
1.8.8 Explain the importance of balancing peace officer roles and responsibilities and other life roles,
interests and responsibilities.
2.3.1 Define the following terms: search warrant, arrest warrant, subpoena, order for protection (OFP), ex-
parte order for protection, qualified domestic violence-related order (QDVRO), Harassment
Restraining Order (HRO), no-contact orders, night-capped warrant, no-knock warrant, and curtilage.
2.3.4 Explain the scope and limitation of a lawful warrant-less seizure during a consent search of persons.
2.3.5 Explain the scope and limitation of a lawful warrantless search of a premise and warrantless search of
a vehicle.
2.3.6 Explain the scope and limitation of a lawful warrant-less search during a search based on exigent
circumstances.
2.3.7 Explain the scope of a lawful warrant-less search during a plain view search.
2.5.1 Describe the basic organization, purpose, and definitions and principles of the Minnesota Criminal
Code.
2.5.2 Explain the classifications of crimes including felony, misdemeanor, gross misdemeanor and the
meaning of the term petty misdemeanor.
2.5.3 Explain what is meant by elements of a crime and describe the connection between criminal conduct
and criminal intent (mens rea).
2.5.4 Explain why it is important for officers to be able to identify and document elements of crimes when
responding to and investigating crime scenes.
2.5.5 Given a variety of scenarios, identify indications a particular crime has been committed and identify
the elements of that crime.
2.5.6 Identify and explain Minnesota Statutes relating to weapons, chemical agents, electronic control
weapons and interference with public property.
2.5.7 Explain special Minnesota peace officer duties associated with specific statutes including: informing
crime victims of their rights and assisting victims of violent crime including domestic assault,
restraining orders and orders for protection, data collection on battered women cases, interviewing
child abuse victims, officer responsibilities regarding missing children, and mandated reporter for child
abuse and vulnerable adults.
2.6.1 Explain the Supreme Court decision Miranda vs. Arizona and the four components of the Miranda
warning.
2.8.1 Explain Minnesota statutes and relevant case law related to the application of force by peace officers.
2.8.2 Explain the following terms: objectively reasonable, totality of circumstances, situational factors, pre-
assaultive indicators, and, escalation and de-escalation as related to peace officer use of force.
2.8.3 Discuss the term reasonable as it related to use of force.
2.8.4 State how department policies regarding use of force including deadly force may and may not vary.
2.8.5 Given scenarios, recognize when force is or is not authorized and give and defend reasonable choices
for the application of various types of force depending on the circumstances of the scenario.
2.8.6 Give Supreme Court case examples authorizing the use of deadly force.
2.8.7 Analyze a variety of situations where force may or may not be authorized and demonstrate an
understanding of the concept of reasonable use of force.
2.8.8 Explain the Minnesota Statute that requires officers be trained in the use of those weapons and
equipment the officer is issued or authorized to carry (Minn. Stat. 626.8452).
2.8.9 Explain when force may be used to make an arrest.
2.8.10 Discuss liabilities associated with the application of force by peace officers.
2.12.1 Explain the concept of racially based profiling (Minn. Stat. 262.8471) and other profiling that is
based on false assumptions about groups of people and discuss: the impact of the Whren v. United
States decision the importance of impartial policing, the difference between the terms pretextual stop
and racial profiling and the problems associated with racial profiling by law enforcement, how racial
profiling impacts law enforcement credibility and community trust, how to handle the perception of
unfair or biased treatment of members of the public by law enforcement, and the importance of an
officer’s ability to articulate valid reasons for vehicle stops.
2.19.1 Explain the intent of the Americans with Disabilities Act.
2.19.2 Discuss the rights of people who have disabilities to the same service law enforcement provides to
anyone else and stereotypes and biases some people may have toward people with disabilities.
2.19.3 Describe major areas of physical and mental disabilities requiring public section accommodations.
2.19.4 Identify special communications issues peace officers may encounter and discuss reasonable and
appropriate actions officers may take to improve communication with individuals: coping with
communication disorders including hearing impairment, whose mobility impairment restricts
communication, and coping with autism spectrum disorders, dementia, Alzheimer’s disease or
intellectual disabilities.
2.19.5 Discuss methods for communicating with, assisting, or intervening in circumstances involving
individuals who demonstrate indications of a variety of physical disabilities or mental impairments.
(Minn. Stat. 626.8455)
2.19.6 Discuss emergency and non-emergency law enforcement situations involving people who have
mobility disabilities, mental illnesses, intellectual disabilities, epilepsy or seizure disorders, speech
disabilities, deafness or hard of hearing, and blindness or low vision and appropriate law enforcement
response to those situations including making modifications or providing accommodations when
appropriate.
2.19.7 Given scenarios that involve people with a variety of physical or mental conditions that limits their
movement, senses, or activities, in roles of crime suspects, victims or witnesses, discuss what
appropriate and reasonable actions peace officers may need to take depending on the circumstances
and abilities of the individuals involved.
2.19.8 Discuss how peace officers may provide respectful, appropriate and reasonable assistance when it is
needed to people with physical or mental conditions that limit their movement, senses or activities.
2.20.1 Describe the major and severe forms of mental illness.
2.20.2 Describe the symptoms of major mental illnesses and how they manifest in adults and children, i.e.,
those associated with antisocial personality disorders, autism spectrum disorders, bipolar disorder
and manic behavior disorders, depression, dis-associative disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder
(PTSD), schizoaffective disorder, schizophrenia, and Tourette’s syndrome.
2.20.3 Identify signs and characteristics that may be indicative of suicidal individuals.
2.20.4 Discuss signs and symptoms of excited delirium and its relationship to mental illness, drugs and
sudden death.
2.20.5 Discuss bias that comes from the stigma of mental illness and the rights of individuals dealing with
mental illness to the same fair treatment and police protection as anyone else.
2.20.6 Discuss the Minnesota Crisis Intervention Team (MNCIT) model.
2.20.7 Discuss how substance abuse can mimic or contribute to mental illness.
2.20.8 Explain how medications may influence behaviors of individuals dealing with mental illness and why
people don’t always take their medications.
2.20.9 Discuss problems military veterans may have reintegrating into society, how these problems may
involve law enforcement and special considerations for dealing with veteran in crisis.
2.21.1 Discuss the role of peace officers in managing and de-escalating hostile situations including how the
attitude and expectations of an officer influences responses in crisis situations.
2.21.2 Describe anger/conflict management strategies useful to officers in resolving problems that arise in law
enforcement settings.
2.21.3 Identify strategies and de-escalation techniques officers may use to manage conflict, reduce anger, and
improve communication and cooperation and de-escalate volatile or hostile situations.
2.21.4 Distinguish between characteristics of passive, aggressive, and assertive behavior.
2.21.5 Discuss body language behaviors that signal potential conflict escalation.
2.21.6 Explain the principles of crisis intervention/negotiations.
2.21.7 Demonstrate basic knowledge of abnormal psychology.
2.21.8 Explain various communications techniques that may be effective in a crisis situation and how
techniques may vary depending on whether the situation involves mental illness, substance induced
behavior, or other causes.
2.21.9 Explain when to yield crisis management to other authorities.
2.21.10 Explain strategies that may be employed when hostages are involved in a crisis situation.
2.22.1 Explain the Data Practices Act as it pertains to the gathering and release of information by law
enforcement.
2.22.2 Discuss balancing the public’s right to know with public safety needs and privacy issues with regard
to data accessed by peace officers including: - what and when information can be shared with the
media or the public and by whom, and - the repercussions of violating data practices.
2.22.4 Discuss ethical and responsible use of computers and databases by peace officers and the
ramifications of misuse or unethical release of data.
3.1.1 Demonstrate effective and legible field-note taking including collecting crime scene intelligence from
witnesses, victims and suspects.
3.1.2 Given crime scene scenarios, solicit information and gather and organize facts needed for a police
report.
3.1.3 Given a variety of law enforcement scenarios prepare reports that: are written from the first person
viewpoint, differentiate between facts, inferences and opinions, demonstrate correct use of grammar,
spelling, punctuation, capitalization, sentence and paragraph structure, are clear, complete, concise
and accurate, and include all relevant details.
3.2.1 Discuss interview techniques used to: build rapport, encourage full meaningful answers and
discourage suggestibility, clarify and corroborate statements, enhance memory, detect deception, and
obtain information from a reluctant witness.
3.2.2 Discuss interview considerations and techniques for interviewing children, vulnerable adults and
traumatized victims.
3.2.3 Discuss how and why interviewing techniques must vary depending on the interviewee and the
circumstances, i.e., when interviewing children, traumatized victims.
3.2.4 Conduct interviews using procedures that: are appropriate to the situation, ensure the protection of
individual rights, effectively gather information, encourage cooperation, and enhance memory.
3.2.5 Conduct interrogations of suspects using appropriate techniques to gather information, detect
deception, and gain an admission or confession depending on the circumstances.
3.2.6 Explain and participate in evidence-based procedures for identifying suspects, i.e., lineup, photo
lineup, and field identification, including blind/blinded administration of the lineup, instructions to the
eye witness that the perpetrator may or may not be present, use of non-suspect “fillers” that match
the eyewitness’s description of the perpetrator and do not make the suspect noticeably stand out and
asking a witness to state his or her level of certainty, in his or her own words, as soon as an
identification is made.
3.2.7. Describe how eyewitness memory works and how it can be impacted by estimator variables (e.g.,
lighting at the crime scene, distance from the crime, presence of a weapon, cross-racial factors) and
system variable (e.g., lineup procedures).
3.3.1 Describe the relationship between good report writing and testimony.
3.3.2 Demonstrate proper courtroom dress and decorum.
3.3.3 Practice preparing for and presenting true and factual testimony in legal proceedings in accordance
with courtroom procedure.
3.3.4 Practice managing cross examination and attempts to discredit.
3.4.1 Discuss how conflict management strategies depend on the situation and various strategies that may
be useful in resolving situations involving individuals dealing with mental illness, substance use, or
developmental disabilities such as autism.
3.4.2 Model reasonable and effective conflict management strategies and skills intended to de-escalate
volatile situations including:
3.4.3 Model reasonable and effective dispute mediation strategies and techniques.
3.7.1 Describe and demonstrate how to make contacts, detentions and arrests including: reading Miranda
rights and verifying understanding, selecting, applying and removing types of restraints, i.e.
handcuffs, flex-cuffs, leg restraints, conducting a search incident to arrest, and describing procedures
for conducting a strip search.
3.7.2 Demonstrate strategies and techniques for safely taking a person into custody in a variety of
locations when: the subject is non-compliant or combative, there are multiple subjects to be arrested,
and the subject(s) are larger and stronger than the officer.
3.7.3 Describe and demonstrate protocols and procedures designed to safely transport a person in custody.
3.7.4 Define the term positional asphyxia and describe its relationship to custody.
3.7.5 Define the terms booking, arraignment, bail and personal recognizance.
3.8.1 Identify officer survival/safety issues related to searches of a person, a vehicle, and a building.
3.8.2 Conduct searches and seizures in accordance with State statutes and criminal code and demonstrate
conscious application of the concepts of reasonable suspicion and probable cause including: a legal,
consensual search of a person, a custodial search, a searching and inventorying of a vehicle including
explaining when a vehicle may be impounded, and a building search.
3.14.1 Discuss the peace officer’s role in active shooter situations.
3.14.2 Explain and/or demonstrate techniques and protocols for effectively and safely responding to crimes
in progress.
3.14.3 Discuss peace officer response to various incidents involving animals, i.e., pet and pet owner issues,
wildlife concerns, abused or neglected animals, loose or sick farm animals, euthanasia by officers and
animal resources.
3.14.4 Explain law enforcement procedures for response to child and vulnerable adult abuse and neglect
situations including: identifying behaviors, signs or symptoms indicative of physical, sexual, and
psychological abuse, maltreatment and neglect, completing mandatory reporting requirements,
contacting appropriate social service agencies, explaining Munchausen by proxy and shaken baby
syndromes, and explaining what sudden infant death syndrome is and how it is not a crime.
3.14.5 Identify mandatory reporters of suspected abuse and discuss where to report, what must be
reported, the confidentiality of reports, and the legal ramifications for not reporting.
3.14.6 Discuss the collaborative child abuse team approach in investigating child abuse.
3.14.7 Discuss special interview consideration when dealing with children including the terms suggestibility
and child centered interviewing.
3.14.8 Explain child welfare holds that allow officers to remove children from at-risk situations.
3.14.13 Discuss the role of peace officers in a variety of disaster and large scale emergencies including: the
importance of initial on-scene assessment for immediate action and resources needed and for on-going
threats and safety concerns, i.e., gas leaks, downed power lines, looters, fires, etc., the importance of
interagency communications and cooperative interaction between law enforcement agencies, utility
companies, and other resources, and large scale traffic and crowd management.
3.14.14 Given a scenario, explain or demonstrate an initial scene assessment.
3.14.15 Summarize the elements of the Incident Command System (ICS) including: the overall objectives and
primary functions of ICS, the typical agencies that are involved in the ICS, the roles of
emergency/first responder in preparedness and response systems during and after disaster situations,
the typical hierarchical chain of command structure, and the role of the FBI if the disaster is related
to foreign or domestic terrorism.
3.14.16 Summarize characteristics of systems involved in preparing for and managing large scale disasters
including: the elements of the national preparedness system and the national response plan, and the
purposes, key concepts and principles of the National Incident Management System (NIMS).
3.14.17 Explain law enforcement functions aimed at protecting critical infrastructure and potential targets
from terrorism and/or natural disasters.
3.14.18 Discuss risks associated with domestic violence situations and safe approach techniques including:
why it is best not to respond alone, the importance of gathering as much information as possible
prior to response, the importance of initial scene assessment, and why it is important not to reveal
the name of the person who requested police response.
3.14.19 Explain when an arrest is warranted, when an arrest is mandatory and the time period in which an
arrest can be made in domestic violence related situations.
3.14.20 Manage a domestic violence scenario including: - performing an initial assessment of the scene for
relevant cues, - calling for back up, medical assistance, child services, or other service as needed -
Taking reasonable actions to stop any on-going abuse including asking to see the alleged victim or
subject of the call alone, requesting entry to residence if necessary to talk to victim and getting a
warrant when needed, - employing communication techniques as appropriate to de-escalate volatile
situations including separating involved parties, explaining rights to victims and providing victim
services information, providing officer contact information to victim, and making arrest decisions
based on probable cause, determination of predominant aggressor, violation of court orders, and other
factors.
3.14.21 Discuss service of protective orders and discuss related risks.
3.14.22 Describe dangers associated with handling drugs and with drug production laboratories and related
precautionary measures.
3.14.23 Describe behavioral symptoms that may be associated with drug use and abuse including the
characteristics and physical effects of psychoactive drugs like methamphetamine.
3.14.24 Describe methods of transportation and concealment of controlled substances/illicit drugs.
3.14.1 Discuss the peace officer’s role in active shooter situations.
3.14.2 Explain and/or demonstrate techniques and protocols for effectively and safely responding to crimes
in progress.
3.14.13 Discuss the role of peace officers in a variety of disaster and large scale emergencies including: the
importance of initial on-scene assessment for immediate action and resources needed and for on-going
threats and safety concerns, i.e., gas leaks, downed power lines, looters, fires, etc., the importance of
interagency communications and cooperative interaction between law enforcement agencies, utility
companies, and other resources, and large scale traffic and crowd management.
3.14.14 Given a scenario, explain or demonstrate an initial scene assessment.
3.14.15 Summarize the elements of the Incident Command System (ICS) including: the overall objectives and
primary functions of ICS, the typical agencies that are involved in the ICS, the roles of
emergency/first responder in preparedness and response systems during and after disaster situations,
the typical hierarchical chain of command structure, and the role of the FBI if the disaster is related
to foreign or domestic terrorism.
3.14.16 Summarize characteristics of systems involved in preparing for alarge scale disasters including: the
elements of the national preparedness system and the national response plan, and the purposes, key
concepts and principles of the National Incident Management System (NIMS).
3.14.17 Explain law enforcement functions aimed at protecting critical infrastructure and potential targets
from terrorism and/or natural disasters.
3.14.18 Discuss risks associated with domestic violence situations and safe approach techniques including:
why it is best not to respond alone, the importance of gathering as much information as possible
prior to response, the importance of initial scene assessment, and why it is important not to reveal
the name of the person who requested police response.
3.14.19 Explain when an arrest is warranted, when an arrest is mandatory and the time period in which an
arrest can be made in domestic violence related situations.
3.14.20 Manage a domestic violence scenario including: - performing an initial assessment of the scene for
relevant cues, - calling for back up, medical assistance, child services, or other service as needed -
Taking reasonable actions to stop any on-going abuse including asking to see the alleged victim or
subject of the call alone, requesting entry to residence if necessary to talk to victim and getting a
warrant when needed, - employing communication techniques as appropriate to de-escalate volatile
situations including separating involved parties, explaining rights to victims and providing victim
services information, providing officer contact information to victim, and making arrest decisions
based on probable cause, determination of predominant aggressor, violation of court orders, and other
factors.
3.14.21 Discuss service of protective orders and discuss related risks.
3.14.22 Describe dangers associated with handling drugs and with drug production laboratories and related
precautionary measures.
3.14.23 Describe behavioral symptoms that may be associated with drug use and abuse including the
characteristics and physical effects of psychoactive drugs like methamphetamine.
3.14.24 Describe methods of transportation and concealment of controlled substances/illicit drugs.
3.14.48 Explain or demonstrate law enforcement procedures for responding to situations and crime scenes
involving juveniles as victims and/or offenders including: enforcing status offense laws, apply laws
applicable to interviewing a juvenile, explaining the 72 hour hold rule governing shelter placements,
the 36 hour hold rule governing detention hold, parent or guardian notification requirements regarding
placements and detentions, and custody and liability issues, applying appropriate data practices
rules governing incidents involving juveniles including who may request and receive juvenile data, and
explaining to whom a juvenile may be released.
3.14.49 Demonstrate familiarity with Minnesota’s missing persons related laws (Minn. Stat. 626.8454,
Minn. Stat. 299C.51-299C.5655, 390.25) and the definitions included therein.
3.14.50 Explain peace officers response and reporting responsibilities relative to missing persons.
3.14.51 Describe the role the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension plays as a resource in missing
person investigations, missing and endangered children and child abductions.
3.14.52 Describe important information to gather relative to a report of a missing child or an endangered
person.
3.14.53 Describe data systems and resources available to Minnesota law enforcement in the investigation of
missing children and endangered persons.
3.14.54 Explain the purpose of and procedures for conducting a neighborhood canvas and other steps
involved in initiating a search for a missing person.
3.14.55 Discuss what an officer should know, behaviors an officer should demonstrate, and communication
tactics officers may find useful when interacting with a person struggling with a mental illness to
maximize safety and more effectively approach a crisis situation including: why it is important to
gather as much information as possible before arriving at a situation involving a mental health crisis,
why it is important to respond in pairs and when to involve a mental health crisis response team if
possible, why, unless the situation is immediately dangerous/critical, officers should not challenge or
violate personal space and try to eliminate noise and distractions, the advantage of having one officer
take lead in communicating, and the importance of having patience, building rapport and
demonstrating compassion.
3.14.56 Given situations involving individuals demonstrating signs and/or characteristics of mental illness,
behavioral disorder or suicidal intentions requiring intervention, demonstrate appropriate
intervention techniques that are likely to be beneficial in managing the situations (Minn. Stat.
626.8455) including: modeling behavior that shows the importance of putting safety first, staying
alert and the danger of complacency or taking anything for granted when dealing with an individual
experiencing a mental health crisis, unless situation appears immediately dangerous/critical, avoiding
challenging or violating personal space, trying to eliminate noise and distractions, having one officer
take lead and open communication from a safe distance, using communication techniques designed to
de-escalate volatile situations including: being patient, calm, honest and compassionate, using active
listening skills while not encouraging or agreeing with delusions, using a calming voice, and avoiding
challenging questions and allowing for venting.
3.14.57 Identify options for resolution of situations involving individuals in mental health crisis situations
including: identifying resources/services that could be called for assistance, and Identifying steps
necessary for obtaining an involuntary commitment order by a law enforcement officer.
3.14.58 Manage a sexual assault situation including: identifying the victim and if the victim is a child,
vulnerable adult or adult, and adjusting communication and procedures appropriately, establishing
rapport with victims i.e., making victims feel safe, letting them know the assault was not their fault,
informing victims of the importance of their cooperation in gathering forensic evidence and pressing
charges while ensuring victims understand that the choice is up to them, advising victims of their
rights and providing them with a victims rights card, assisting victims in contacting an advocate when
appropriate, determining and responding to the immediate medical needs of victims, communicating
with the medical staff treating the victim regarding the need for a forensic evaluation/use of a sexual
assault kit to collect evidence, and identifying, protecting, collecting and preserving evidence
including photographs, clothing, seminal fluid, saliva, hairs, blood, bedding, fibers, etc.
3.14.59 Define the terms white collar crime and identity theft and describe the importance of evidence
protection in investigation of financial fraud, white collar crime and identify theft.
3.14.60 Demonstrate appropriate response tactics when called to a situation involving a motor vehicle crash
including: talking to and being aware of other responders on the road, demonstrating approach tactics
appropriate to situation and weather related conditions and to block and protect the crash scene,
demonstrating appropriate actions to safely and effectively manage the crash scene, preserving and
processing crash-scene evidence, explaining the additional steps to be taken when responding to a
“hit and run” accident, distinguishing between a required reportable accident and an accident not
required to be reported, safely re-opening traffic lanes following crash response, interviewing drivers
and witnesses and obtaining the required information to file the accident report form, assisting
people who need medical help and/or transportation, explaining traffic crash reporting requirements
and completing the State of Minnesota-Dept. of Public Safety Accident Report Form, explaining the
use of the Fatality Report (PS-07093), organizing collected evidence for the case file, employing
traffic direction techniques, and arranging for crash to be removed from the roadway.
4.1.1 Describe and demonstrate command presence and tactically safe approach techniques in a variety of
law enforcement situations.
4.1.5 Demonstrate proper handcuffing techniques from several positions and under a variety of
circumstances including: proper use of clear and concise verbal commands, techniques for use with
cooperative and uncooperative subjects, team handcuffing techniques; both standing & prone, tactical
positioning and subject control during handcuffing and searching, proper application of handcuffs
(placement, tightness) and double locking, and proper positioning and transporting of handcuffed
subject.
4.3.4 In real-time scenario exercises, make decisions about reasonable use of force.
4.4.1 Possess a valid driver’s license.
4.5.3 Demonstrate use of information technology tools to access, manage, integrate and create information
for law enforcement and public safety purposes including interpreting crime data and trends.

Credit Details
  • Lecture: 0
  • Lab: 2
  • MnTC Goal: 0
Course Details
  • Prerequisites: 
    Admission into the Law Enforcement Program
  • Campus: Brooklyn Park

Apply Now Search Awards Search Courses